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Table 7 Domain accretion in complex eukaryotes

From: A comprehensive evolutionary classification of proteins encoded in complete eukaryotic genomes

  Hsa Dme Ath Cel Sce Spo Ecu
Hsa   <1 × 10-10 <1 × 10-10 <1 × 10-10 <1 × 10-10 <1 × 10-10 <1 × 10-10
  470       
Dme 3214   2 × 10-1 <1 × 10-10 <1 × 10-10 <1 × 10-10 <1 × 10-10
  805       
  327 354      
Ath 2224 2085   3 × 10-1 <1 × 10-10 <1 × 10-10 <1 × 10-10
  530 403      
  347 428 334     
Cel 2986 2962 2052   1 × 10-8 <1 × 10-10 <1 × 10-10
  880 650 376     
  149 161 183 197    
Sce 1789 1704 1769 1715   1 × 10-2 <1 × 10-10
  504 411 374 336    
  100 123 135 150 158   
Spo 1880 1807 1886 1808 2360   <1 × 10-10
  549 426 388 359 216   
  10 17 12 14 13 19  
Ecu 700 738 739 748 816 835  
  332 254 235 244 158 140  
  1. For a given pair of species the numbers in each cell below the diagonal represent, from top to bottom: the number of KOGs in which the average number of detected domains from the CDD collection (cut-off E = 10-3) in the proteins from the species to the left is greater than that for the species to the right; the number of KOGs with equal average number of domains; the number of KOGs in which the average number of domains is greater for the species to the right (for example, D. melanogaster has a greater number of detected domains than H. sapiens in 470 KOGs, the same number in 3,214 KOGs, and a smaller number in 805 KOGs). The numbers above the diagonal are the statistical significance of the difference, P(χ2).