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  1. A minimally redundant set of 15,000 mouse cDNAs derived from early and mid-gestation has been used to analyze global patterns of gene expression in the placenta and embryo.

    Authors: Paul Denny

    Citation: Genome Biology 2000 1:reports0069

    Content type: Paper report

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  2. The GRAIL server is one of the many internet resources for predicting genes in uncharacterized genomic DNA.

    Authors: Todd Richmond

    Citation: Genome Biology 2000 1:reports2053

    Content type: Web report

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  3. EMOTIF search is one of a set of four integrated bioinformatics resources at Stanford University devoted to constructing and searching for motifs in protein sequences.

    Authors: Todd Richmond

    Citation: Genome Biology 2000 1:reports2052

    Content type: Web report

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  4. Genome structure confirms the chastity of some ancient asexuals.

    Authors: James Cotton

    Citation: Genome Biology 2000 1:reports0068

    Content type: Paper report

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  5. Analysis of highly metastatic melanoma cells using oligonucleotide arrays has identified genes regulating tumor invasiveness.

    Authors: Jonathan B Weitzman

    Citation: Genome Biology 2000 1:reports0067

    Content type: Paper report

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  6. The genes involved in the assembly and function of the polar flagellum of Vibrio parahaemolyticus have been analyzed systematically by mutagenesis, DNA sequencing and transcriptional studies.

    Authors: William Deakin

    Citation: Genome Biology 2000 1:reports0065

    Content type: Paper report

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  7. A new bacterial alternative to the yeast two-hybrid system and phage display for detecting protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions is described.

    Authors: Rachel Brem

    Citation: Genome Biology 2000 1:reports0064

    Content type: Paper report

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  8. A report from the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory 2000 conference on Retroviruses, Cold Spring Harbor, May 23-28, 2000.

    Authors: Cecile Voisset and Mariam Andrawiss

    Citation: Genome Biology 2000 1:reports4015.1

    Content type: Meeting report

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  9. A series of reports - and extracts of reports - from the Freedom of Information Conference, 6-7 July, 2000, New York Academy of Medicine. The conference was sponsored by BioMed Central, to promote debate about...

    Authors: Harold Varmus, David Lipman, Paul Ginsparg and Barry P Markovitz

    Citation: Genome Biology 2000 1:comment2003.1

    Content type: Opinion

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  10. A concurrence of genomic, reverse genetic and biochemical approaches has cracked the decade-long enigma concerning the identity of the transcription factors that control gene expression at the G2/M transition ...

    Authors: Paul Jorgensen and Mike Tyers

    Citation: Genome Biology 2000 1:reviews1022.1

    Content type: Minireview

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  11. Transcriptional analysis of all the genes expressed by breast tumors has provided the first steps towards defining a molecular signature for the disease, and might ultimately make conventional diagnostic techn...

    Authors: Samuel AJR Aparicio, Carlos Caldas and Bruce Ponder

    Citation: Genome Biology 2000 1:reviews1021.1

    Content type: Minireview

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  12. Genome-wide measures of DNA strand composition have been used to find archaeal DNA replication origins. Archaea seem to replicate using a single origin (as do eubacteria) even though archaeal replication facto...

    Authors: Amit Vas and Janet Leatherwood

    Citation: Genome Biology 2000 1:reviews1020.1

    Content type: Minireview

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  13. The recently published genomic sequence of Xylella fastidiosa is the first for a free-living plant pathogen and provides clues to mechanisms of pathogenesis and survival in insect vectors. The sequence data shoul...

    Authors: Noel T Keen, C Korsi Dumenyo, Ching-Hong Yang and Donald A Cooksey

    Citation: Genome Biology 2000 1:reviews1019.1

    Content type: Minireview

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  14. Key components of the programmed cell death pathway are conserved between Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster and humans. The search for additional homologs has been facilitated by the availability of...

    Authors: Jan N Tittel and Hermann Steller

    Citation: Genome Biology 2000 1:reviews0003.1

    Content type: Review

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