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  1. Information for establishing the anterior-posterior axis of a mammalian embryo is contained in the fertilized egg.

    Authors: Cathy Holding

    Citation: Genome Biology 2001 2:reports0012

    Content type: Paper report

    Published on:

  2. Comparison of the two drafts of the human genome sequence has revealed reassuring similarity but also some differences.

    Authors: Jonathan B Weitzman

    Citation: Genome Biology 2001 2:reports0013

    Content type: Paper report

    Published on:

  3. The Blocks server allows access to multiply aligned ungapped sequence segments corresponding to the most highly conserved regions of proteins, and aids detection and verification of protein sequence homologies...

    Authors: David Chambers

    Citation: Genome Biology 2001 2:reports2003

    Content type: Web report

    Published on:

  4. The proper balance between epithelial cell proliferation, quiescence, and apoptosis during development is mediated by the specific temporal and spatial appearance of transcription factors, growth factors, cyto...

    Authors: Michael Melnick, Haiming Chen, Yan Min Zhou and Tina Jaskoll

    Citation: Genome Biology 2001 2:preprint0005.1

    Content type: Deposited research article

    Published on:

  5. Germ-cell nuclear factor (GCNF, NR6AI) is an orphan nuclear receptor. Its expression pattern suggests it functions during embryogenesis, in the placenta and in germ-cell development. Mouse GCNF cDNA codes for a p...

    Authors: Ute Süsens and Uwe Borgmeyer

    Citation: Genome Biology 2001 2:research0017.1

    Content type: Research

    Published on:

  6. Numerous factors that influence cell-surface carbohydrate composition remain to be elucidated. The combination of novel biochemical and metabolism-based approaches with emerging genomic methods promises to acc...

    Authors: Kevin J Yarema and Carolyn R Bertozzi

    Citation: Genome Biology 2001 2:reviews0004.1

    Content type: Review

    Published on:

  7. The Rab family is part of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases. There are at least 60 Rab genes in the human genome, and a number of Rab GTPases are conserved from yeast to humans. The different Rab GTPases ar...

    Authors: Harald Stenmark and Vesa M Olkkonen

    Citation: Genome Biology 2001 2:reviews3007.1

    Content type: Protein family review

    Published on:

  8. A few dozen genes are known on the human Y chromosome. The completion of the human genome sequence will allow identification of the remaining loci, which should shed further light on the function and evolution...

    Authors: Doris Bachtrog and Brian Charlesworth

    Citation: Genome Biology 2001 2:reviews1016.1

    Content type: Minireview

    Published on:

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