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Fig. 7 | Genome Biology

Fig. 7

From: Lamin C is required to establish genome organization after mitosis

Fig. 7

Model of lamin C role in genome organization. Top panel: Post translational modifications (e.g., phospho-serine 22) of lamin C allows its nucleoplasmic localization during mitotic exit and into early G1. During this phase, lamin C is spatially excluded from LADs potentially via protein-protein interactions (for example with Lap2ɑ) on euchromatin and/or phase separation phenomena. We propose that this nucleoplasmic pool physically hinders aberrant inter-chromosomal LAD interactions and reinforces intra-chromosomal A/B compartmentalization, both of which are affected in the absence of lamin C. Bottom panel, left: in mid to late G1, the sustained interchromosomal compartmentalization of LADs is maintained as they, and a subset of lamin C, arrive at the nuclear periphery, as depicted. A subset of phospho-lamin C interacts with euchromatin at NPC. At the lamina, the lamin C that is incorporated into the lamina meshwork is unphosphorylated and we speculate that this de-phosphorylation is required for its incorporation into a NE lamin network. Bottom right panel: inside-out view of LAD/lamina meshwork organization. LADs are shown as transparent red areas and non-LADs are not shown. LADs show robust proximity to all three lamin isotypes, while the lamins A, B, and C form distinct networks. Lamin C (green) is shown as interacting preferentially with nuclear pores (compared to lamins A and B)

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