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Fig. 1 | Genome Biology

Fig. 1

From: Molecular evolutionary trends and feeding ecology diversification in the Hemiptera, anchored by the milkweed bug genome

Fig. 1

The large milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus, shown in its phylogenetic and environmental context. a Species tree of selected Hemiptera with genomic and transcriptomic resources, based on phylogenetic analyses and divergence time estimates in [3]. Species marked with an asterisk (*) have published resources; those with the appellation “i5K” are part of a current pilot project supported by the Baylor College of Medicine Human Genome Sequencing Center and the National Agricultural Library of the USDA. Note that recent analyses suggest the traditional infraorder Cimicomorpha, to which Rhodnius and Cimex belong, may be paraphyletic [16]. b, c Milkweed bugs on their native food source, the milkweed plant: gregarious nymphs of different instars on a milkweed seed pod (b) and pale, recently eclosed adults and their shed exuvia (c). Images were taken at Avalon Park and Preserve, Stony Brook, NY, USA, courtesy of Deniz Erezyilmaz, used with permission. d Individual bugs, shown from left to right: first instar nymphs (ventral and dorsal views) and adults (dorsal and lateral views); images courtesy of Kristen Panfilio (nymphs) and Jena Johnson (adults), used with permission. The arrow labels the labium (the “straw”), part of the hemipteran mouthpart anatomy adapted for feeding by piercing and sucking

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